Don’t ya wanna go where everybody knows your name?

In my hometown, I couldn’t leave the house without running into someone I knew, and if you were at all involved in the community (like I was), those ‘six degrees of separation’ were more like two (at max). There were certainly times when I griped about everyone knowing everyone (my parents were often friends with my teachers/bosses/ex’s parents, for example), but generally I loved knowing I had a friend in every corner of my town. 

What do you do in a small town? Pose with the friends you've had since kindergarten on lawnmowers, of course! (circa 2010)

What do you do in a small town? Pose with friends you’ve had since kindergarten on lawnmowers, of course! (circa 2010)

So naturally, moving to the biggest city in Canada was super terrifying to me. My life as a big fish in a small pond was now that of a small fish in a REALLY FREAKING HUGE OCEAN. #FearOfTotalInsignificance

Once I attended GL open houses though, I was sure Glendon was the place for me. People were way more genuine and engaging than other schools I visited. They actually CARED about whether or not you felt you could fit in and find your niche on campus. As soon as I started here, I understood why…

Glendon students are friendly – outrageously so. It’s a small school, and if you’re lost on your way to class – we’ll know. We’ll also be the one to direct and escort you to where you need to be. We’re not afraid to introduce ourselves to new students, volunteer at Orientation events and Open Houses, strike up a conversation with the person next to us in the cafeteria, etc. We want you to be one of those other super-nice people we hang out with!

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Glendonites are inclusive – with a visible queer community on campus, a large population of international students, and students from what seems like every possible ethnic/religious/socioeconomic background and more, we are bonded together by our differences. We’re proud to be diverse, and we always have each others’ backs in order to protect and celebrate those differences.

Some of our über friendly, diverse, and supportive Frosh leaders to help ease the transition :)

Some of our über friendly, diverse, and supportive Frosh leaders to help ease the transition 🙂

We’re so proud of who we are. We recognize that we are York students, and walk with our heads held high – but we REALLY love our campus (it’s gorgeous). We’re loyal to the blue, to our liberal arts lovin’, to our bilingual mission, to our collaborative and creative nature. ‘School pride’ doesn’t even begin to cut it with us.

Sarah and I showing off our school pride at Explore Glendon! #OuiTheBlue

Sarah and I showing off our school pride at Explore Glendon! #OuiTheBlue

 

Oh, and if we meet an Glendon grad, we’re instant BFFs – it usually goes something like this:

OMG NO WAY! YOU WENT TO GLENDON?! DIDN’T YOU JUST LOVE IT SO MUCH?! TELL ME YOUR LIFE STORY!

So yes, I still get that feeling of anonymity in my everyday life – it’s impossible to be friends with all 2,600 students here, or the 50,000 at Keele. However, there are friendly faces in my precious green oasis in the city. Glendon is my family: I’m never just a number, and I’ll always have this awesome community to call home.

//end loving brag.

DFTBA,

– K

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